Studio — Research Groups
Spring 2016
Museum Mediations & Interventions

MUSEUM MEDIATIONS AND INTERVENTIONS:  APPLYING DIGITAL MEDIA, ART, AND DESIGN TO PUSH THE LIMITS OF CURATION, EXHIBITION, AND VIEWERSHIP

 

Research Group, Spring 2016 (DM Coordinated by Edward Shanken, Digital+Media Wednesdays, 6-9pm (perhaps negotiable)

This research collaboration offers the extraordinary opportunity to use the RISD Museum as a platform to develop our own artistic mediations and interventions. Working closely with RISD Museum Deputy Director Sarah Ganz Blythe and Digital Content Producer Jeremy Radtke we will push the limits of conventional forms of art, curation, exhibition, and viewership.
The rich history of artists’ museum interventions includes work by Hans Haacke, Fred Wilson, Sophie Calle, Guerilla Girls, JODI, and others (some recent examples below). Our own mediations and interventions will deploy emerging digital practices to address a wide range of legal and social issues.

 

Research Questions:

The goal is not to undermine conventional museum practice but to problematize it, augment it, create transparency, and expand the roles and functions of artists, audiences, and museums. How can we exacerbate tensions, build alliances, and push museums in ways that extend or reformulate the relationship between objects, people and cultural institutions? What are the key issues today and what do we envision they will be in ten years? What historical approaches are worth revisiting or reconfiguring? How can we expand the use of smart phones, social media, and other devices and cultural practices beyond the obvious?

The group will frequently meet at the RISD Museum, where we will work closely with museum staff to develop and implement proposals for mediations and interventions. We will research the state of the art of museological practices involving digital media and the history of artistic mediations of museums and exhibitions, with special attention to contemporary interventions staged by artists using digital media. Naturally, the resources and technical support of the Digital+Media program will be at our disposal.  

Anticipated outcomes will include actual mediations and interventions and/or proposals for mediations and interventions that could stimulate further research and development.  

Interested? Please contact Ed Shanken <eshanken@risd.edu>.

Fall 2015
Captured Landscapes

Focusing on historic and contemporary imaging technology, Captured Landscape investigates how the Bay Area has redefined the limits of “seeing” from the pioneering photographic work of Edward Muybridge, to the Lawrence Berkeley Lab, to NASA’s Airborne Sensor Facility.

Approaching the region as intrepid explorers, we absurdly subvert technologies – new and old – that are intended to extend human vision outward in order to examine the world around us with fresh eyes. Positing the Bay Area as America’s “final frontier”, we collaborate with scientists and engineers in order to develop instruments and methodologies to capture, analyze, and map this strange, new terrain.

Fall 2014
Technological Landscapes

Tech-Land is a group of multidisciplinary artists, designers, researchers, and curators engaging with themes of social science and technology through art. We investigate everyday technologies that form and inform the multiplicity of worlds we live in today – from social networking, anomalies, control, mediation, myths and religion to political identities.

By interrogating real-world events influenced or caused by technological advancement and/or failure, we exploit the imaginative, speculate possible near futures, and position them where the poetic crosses between science fiction(s) and built realities.

Our work and research include video, product, sculpture, speculative narrative, and writing. Texts play a major role in contextualizing the work and linking to “real” world situations and actors exploring similar issues in diverse mediums/fields.

These works catalyze a questioning of how technology affects our perception of past, present and future and seek to create space for audiences to reflect on the social, psychological, and cultural relationships that result of life supported and surrounded by technology.

Technological Landscape website